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Walking Tour of Homes

Take a walk past 36 homes featuring varied architectural designs dating from 1870 to the early 1900's.

1104 1st Avenue South

The O.A. Patterson home was built in the 1890’s. The columns were only decorative, as there was no porch to speak of. It has two-story Greek Ionic columns, unusual rounded gables, decorative portico with no door entry, cantilevered bay window on the east side, and closely set dentins under the eves.

 

Tour of Homes 1104 1st Avenue South

1110 1st Avenue South

The Hayes home was built in the 1890’s. Typical Victorian style with sunburst design under the front gable, wrap around porch with spindles, leaded glasses bay window, and Doric columns.

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Tour of Homes 1110 1st Avenue South

1012 Broadway

The Dr. Brannon home was built in the early 1900’s. It’s a 2-story square stucco house with red tile roof with Doric columns supporting the roof and an enclosed sunroom on each end.

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Tour of Homes Wehle

22 Avenue A

H. Hartwig built this home in the 1890’s. It is one of the first “prefab” houses put out from Sears & Roebuck. The components arrive by train, hauled to the present location by horse and wagon and assembled on the sight. Special features are the Doric columns on the first and second story porch, several gables, decorative brackets under the 2nd story bay, and leaded glass windows.

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22 Avenue A

407 North Main Street

The original house was built in 1896 for $8,000 by John Fastje for George Naeve, an abstractor and notary public. It has several architectural influences-dentins under eves and heavily bracketed hoods under deeply pitched fish scale projections. There is a later addition for extra living quarters.

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107  North Main Street

1306 4th Avenue North

Originally built by AC Balle in 1886, it is now the Dr. DW Crabb residence. Balle was the owner of a big department store in town, which was known all over the middle West for quality goods. This Victorian cottage with sharply pitched roof has a central chimney, Doric columns, and porch spindles (now replaced by a solid rail).

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1306 4th Avenue North

1314 4th Avenue North

This home was built in 1910 by Julius Balle, son of AC Balle. A “spite” wall was built to keep the neighbors prying eyes from seeing activities going on in the house. The New England gambrel roofed home has Roman Doric columns, eyebrow windows in the roof, and dentins under the eves.

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Tour of Homes Franck

1330 4th Avenue North

This home was built around 1896 for Dr. BF Philbrook, the dentist that patented the in-lay technique. It is now covered in white stucco.

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Tour of Homes Stoll

1404 4th Avenue North

This Victorian English Tudor home was built around 1890 for J.C. Robinson who was also a dentist. The braces over the stucco are called half timbers.

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1416 4th Avenue North

This typical home was built around 1896 for TC McCarthy.  He owned a beer tavern in a prominent brick building in town. Notice the fish scale decorations under the gable.

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Tour of Homes Magnuson

204 North 14th Street

Built around 1890 for CJ Soloman, who had a furniture store and was also an undertaker. The former porch was removed leaving no remnants of the Victorian style.

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Tour of Homes 204 North 14th

1328 2nd Avenue North

The ES Plimpton home built around 1870 is the oldest house in town, and was built with Denison brick. Mr. Plimpton was a grocer and owner of West Denison Mills. The Greek Revival style illustrates symmetrically built additions that were added on as needed and a style that directly preceded the Victorian. It is now apartments.

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Tour of Homes 1328 2nd Avenue North

1414 1st Avenue North

This home was built in the early 1900’s for Barney Brodersen, a pioneer builder and Denison merchant-part owner of Balle Brodersen Department Store.  Applied decorations are confined to fancy eve brackets. There has been very little change since it was originally built, including the fence. The present residence is a beauty shop and home.

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Tour of Homes Techenberg

1428 1st Avenue North

This home was built in 1895 costing $25,000 for W.A. McHenry, a wealthy farmer and famous for his Aberdeen Angus herd. Now it is owned by the Crawford County Historical Society and appropriated as a museum with CrawfordCounty memorabilia. The original home had six fireplaces, with the third floor used as a ballroom. It was lighted with gas but converted to electricity. The parquet floors still remain.  In the 1930’s six rooms on the back were removed. The fish scale shingle decorations are prominent.

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1428 1st Ave N

1510 Broadway

Denison’s first school superintendent, ZT Hawk, lived in this typical Victorian style, with steeply pitched roof, ornately decorated gables, spindle railings, and double Doric columns supporting a wrap-around porch. At present, this residence is an apartment house.

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1536 Broadway

JW Hill’s Victorian style home was built around 1890. The richly decorated gable with sunburst design had interesting dentin detail under the eves.  Notice the five windowed tower with paneled frieze under the eves. Mr. Hill owned the monument works in Denison.

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Tour of Homes 1536 Broadways

1606 Broadway

This home was built around 1920 for PW Harding, one of the first women lawyers in Iowa. Small pillars supported by a large brick rail decorated the porch.

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Tour of Homes 1606 Broadway

1706 Broadway

TJ Garrison, a noted lawyer, built his house in 1898. First quality hardwood was used as wood was plentiful until after World War I. Typical elaborated turn posts decorated the front porch. Scalloped shingles surround the turret; the home has town rounded porches with the same row of delicate spindles. The third floor has decorative windows with applied designed under the eves of the turret. The gazebo is original. The barn was moved next door to the east and made into a house.

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Tour of Homes Engelhart

1820 Broadway

The E.J. Heston house was built in 1879. The style of windows and doors are typical “Italianate” architecture. A summer kitchen originally was attached. Notice the “eye brow brackets” over the windows as well as the fancy brackets around the bay window eves. The double front door and limestone basement framed windows are interesting features. Mr. Heston was the county treasurer and also a real estate agent.

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1820 Broadway

1425 Broadway

The present Pfannebecker Funeral Home was built for Henry Clay Laub in the late 1800’s. Mr. Laub was one of the pioneers of Denison. The stable is now used for a garage. White horses were used to draw the hearse for juvenile funerals while black horses signified adult burials. The sunburst stain glass windows under the gable and applied scalloped decorations on the eves are typical of the Victorian period.  Originally it has tow parlors, the hall was terra cotta and gold.

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1425 Broadway

1430 1st Avenue South

The present Detlefsen Apartment house was built in 1890 for L.W. Shaw. He was governor of Iowa for two terms and Secretary of the US Treasury under Theodore Roosevelt-the main reason “Teddy” visited Denison twice while president.  The applied decorations under the eves are called “egg and dart.” The delicate columns for a heavy porch originally had a spindle rail.

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104 South 15th Street

In 1900, this house was built for J.P. Conner with Denison brick costing $7,000. He was the owner of the Denison Review and a Congress Representative. Notice the fish scale siding under the gable, stain glass window on the second floor, delicate columns on the porch, drip stones over the windows and interesting detail under the eves. This home is presently Conner’s Corner Bed & Breakfast.

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Tour of Homes 104 South 15th Street

120 South 15th Street

The C.F. Kuehnle residence was built in 1881. Mr. Kuehnle was one of the founders of the Bank of Denison. He was politically active and he and his wife were very prominent in the social whirl as well. The Victorian style is present in the dentins under the eves and the wrap-around porch with Doric columns. Notice the leaded glass windows on the first floor. The third floor ballroom held many elaborate parties. The restorations are authentic with the Victorian style.

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Tour of Homes Carlyle

1516 2nd Avenue South

This stately mansion was built in 1898 for Charles Voss, a local businessman who built his fortune in banking and land deals. The west side has a portico and the wrap-around porch has lonic columns and spindle railings. The chimney shows decorative brickwork.

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1516 2nd Ave S

1528 2nd Avenue South

In 1885 the R.A. Romans house was built. An outstanding feature is the breezeway on the west where carriage passengers could disembark and be met by the hostess, although it is not the main entrance of the house. This Victorian house feature a portico and ornate “gingerbread” decorations with a swap-around porch on three sides. There are delicately turned Victorian columns.

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1528 2nd Ave S

1529 2nd Avenue South

Claus Scriver, a local lumberman, had this house built in the late 1890’s. He also made harness and patented wire and picket fencing. Special features are the fish scale siding, brackets and dentins under the eves, and stain glass panels on the upper bay windows.

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Tour of Homes Miller

1523 3rd Avenue South

The M.E. Jones residence was built in the early 1900’s. Mr. Jones was a banker and his home was typical to the rising middle class of that time.

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Tour of Homes Mendlik

1433 2nd Avenue South

The Kelly home was built in the 1910’s for $10,000. The remaining outstanding feature is the wrap-around porch and original spindle.

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Tour of Homes Campbell

1434 2nd Avenue South

A home on the National Place of Historic Registry, as Clarence Chamberlain lived here from 1910 to 1914. He flew from New York to Germany, June 4 to June 6, 1927 and broke a long distance record set two weeks earlier by Charles Lindberg. In August of that year, Chamberlain made the first trans-Atlantic mail flight. Much of his later career was spent as a test pilot for a variety of aircraft manufacturers. He became a member of the Aviation Hall of fame in July 1976.

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217 South 15th Street

The John Menagh home was built in 1889 as a flourmill and lumberyard with building supplies and was a creamery agent. Typically Victorian features are fish scale designs under the gable, corbelling on the chimney, spindle porch railing, and Doric columns.

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303 South 15th Street

The Col. Green Victorian cottage was built in 1880 using Denison brick. His brickyard furnished much of the brick used for local construction.

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318 South 15th Street

George Sprecker’s home was built in the 1890’s. The house was a block north of the depot, and at that time Mr. Sprecker was the railroad agent. The home has been authentically renovated. Special features are the sunburst design under the front gable, leaded glass bay window, and spindle rail with Doric columns.

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318 South 15th Street

1319 2nd Avenue South

The Charles Bullock residence was built in the 1896. He was a lawyer, land agent, and dealer in drugs, medicine, paint oils, and liquors. The special Victorian features are the fish scale design, dentin braces, and ornate lightning rod on the turret. Interesting details are on the porch gable, the diamond panelled glass bay windows, the spindle railing and design under the porch.

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1319 2nd Ave S

1118 2nd Avenue South

The G.L. Caswell home was built in the early 1900’s. It is an example of a larger house in an area of smaller ones. He was owner of the Denison Bulletin Newspaper. Special features are the leaded glass diamond paned windows and twin columns on a wrap around porch.

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1118 2nd Ave S

831 2nd Avenue South

The Earnest Riepen house was constructed in 1892 using Denison brick. He had an icehouse, and was a saloon keeper, selling Standard Brewing Beer that won 1st prize at the World’s Fair. He also had a “wild animal” park. The Catholic Church purchased the property in 1910. Interesting features are the 6-sided turret ornate dentin treatment under the gable, Doric columns on the turret, wrap-around spindle porch, and decorative brick dentins over the window.

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831 2nd Ave S

1022 1st Avenue South

German emigrant Rudolph Lehfeldt built his home in 1890. He was a sheep farmer and also a State Legislator. It has a steeply pitched, many gabled roof with decorative supporting brackets, wrap-around porch, leaded glass in the bay windows, dentins under the roof gables, and decorative porch gable.

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Tour of Homes Lorenzen
 

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